facilitation

Learning facilitation

What are these qualities? What are the behaviours?

Lets’ start with the behaviours, or skills, if you like. This is what facilitators do when with a group…

  • Challenge habitual thinking and behaviour
  • Hold space
  • Model behaviours
  • Notice and reflect back
  • Look for opportunities to get out of the way

Do I hear a how? How do facilitators do all of this? By…

  • Selecting appropriate activities and processes
  • Providing a suitable environment/space
  • Keeping track of time and progress
  • Clarifying, questioning, sometimes challenging and summarising
  • Being non-partisan, not taking sides, not having pre-determined answers/outcomes
  • Ensuring the group does the work
  • Ensuring that the group’s work is captured, when necessary (which implies knowing when that is)

Hmmm….Is that all there is to facilitating? What distinguishes pedestrian facilitation from great facilitation?

Maybe it’s the personal qualities, or attitudes, that facilitators bring…

  • Humility
  • Empathy
  • Bravery and a willingness to fail gracefully
  • Playfulness
  • Presence
  • Curiosity
  • Flexibility
  • Responsiveness

If I’m learning to be a facilitator, I probably want to learn the how (processes, techniques, tip and tricks) first. Then I’d want to know about application, when and why I would use one and not the other. Problem is, learning is not linear. It happens in loops and leaps, in small moments of clarity, in confusion and messiness. In other words, learning, and meaning, emerges. It can’t be structured in a way that makes sense to everyone because everyone learns differently (and no, I’m not thinking learning styles – that’s been well and truly debunked).

Here’s the dilemma. While learning is non-linear, the training is. It starts on Monday, finishes on Friday. Each day has a start and an end. We progress from one day to the next. Doing what? There’s no end of choices really.

It’s the curse of the agenda: in advance, we’ll decide we’ll do this, then that, then something else. I don’t know until I’m in the room with the group what the group really needs. The group becomes its own learning laboratory – it has within it all the complexity and messiness of any group of humans. It comes down to the curse of planning. We have the ability to think ahead, to plan what we’ll do. In many cases that’s a sensible thing to do. If I have to catch a plane I need to plan when to get to the airport, and make sure I go to the right airport. The consequences of not planning are pretty clear. I can apply the same thinking to working with a group of people. I can plan certain things – when we’ll start, when we’ll finish, where we will meet, when we will break for lunch, why we are meeting. It’s harder to plan for what might happen with a group of people, especially once I use a process that is participatory. If I follow a plan meticulously, I might miss some opportunity, or something important. If I have no plan at all…

I’ll need to draw on my ability to be spontaneous and improvise, to use what’s available (including the people in the room) combined with my own skills and knowledge of facilitation.

If an agenda is not so helpful, what is? Learning outcomes? At the end of this training, you will be able to…will understand…will know… Hmmm… There might be a shift towards these things. Learning may happen during the training. Most likely it won’t. It might happen next time one of them is in front of a group. Who am I to determine what learning you need? Nope, learning outcomes don’t help me.

In the end I need to do what I usually do – start somewhere, see what happens. Notice. Respond. Do something else. Explain what I’m doing and why. Provide opportunities to experience different approaches (processes) – not just watch, actually be a part of them, exploring topics that illuminate even more about working with groups. I need to be prepared for a number of possible approaches and to offer a rich and diverse, human, experience that enables people to learn at their own pace, to struggle in their own way, to allow meaning and insight to emerge by providing space and opportunities for them to make their own meaning, rather than me impose my meaning.

The topic of facilitation is so large, I need some anchors, some boundaries: time is one (a one-day course is very different from a five-day course); the participants and their current level of understanding is another (I won’t know that until I work with them). Briefing from the client? Can be unreliable, especially if they’re not sure themselves what they want. Facilitation principles? Too abstract. Qualities of a facilitator? Too obscure.

WHAT IS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A PROGRAMME FOR APPROVAL THROUGH THE SETA

What you need to submit a Learning Programme for approval through the SETA.

The following steps are followed in order to submit a learning programme (unit standards) for approval through the ETQA (SETA).

Note: We make reference to the ETQA (Education Training Quality Authority) and not the SETA. The reason for this is because the ETQA Department/Manager within the SETA will review your programme and issue approval. (SETA has different departments who are responsible for different task. The ETQA manager will ultimately approve your programme.)

STEP 1: SETA APPLICATION

 Download the SETA application forms from their website, or contact their ETQA Manager and request the documents.

These documents may include:

-Application document that must be submitted with the programme in order to be processed.

-Include personal and Training Provider contact detail.

-Flow process, summary and matrix copy.

-Checklist that must be completed by the application to ensure all the documentation is correct and in order.

-Administration process (flow processes from printing to uploading)

-OPTIONAL: QMS Policy

 

STEP 2: LIST OF ASSESSORS AND MODERATORS

List of the Assessors and Moderators must be attached.

 

-Must have at least one (1) qualified assessors that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter from the SETA that allows the Assessors to assess in this unit standard.

-Must have at least one (1) qualified moderator that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter form the SETA that allows the Moderators to moderate in this unit standard.

-The Assessors and the Moderator cannot be the same person.

 

STEP 3: IF PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE:

This is “optional” for those individuals who purchased the programme from a third party or developer directory. (Did not develop their own material.)

 

The following information will be required additional with your submission:

-Copy of the purchase agreement that highlight the printing and usage rights.

-Internal moderators report to confirm you have the scope and resources to deliver this programme.

-If this material was previously approved for another training provider, copy/full details of this must also be supplied.

 

STEP 4 : MATRIX AND DELIVERY STRATEGY

Full matrix that include at least the following fields.

Summary:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Unit Standard Description
  3. Purpose of the Unit Standard
  4. Credits with a breakdown of the Notional Hours.
  5. NQF level
  6. Entry Level requirements.
  7. How the CCFO’s was covered and where it is covered in the learning programme.

Detailed:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Specific Outcomes + Numbered
  3. Assessment Criteria + Numbered
  4. Range Statements + Numbered
  5. CCFO + Numbered
  6. Learning Outcomes + Numbered
  7. Theory Notional Hours
  8. Practical Notional Hours
  9. Timeline in classroom
  10. Formative Activity methods
  11. Reference to Formative Activity numbers
  12. Summative Activity methods
  13. Reference to Summative Activity numbers.
  14. Resources, equipment required.
  15. Facilitation method (delivery strategy)

 

STEP 5 : FACILITATORS GUIDE

Detailed facilitator guide that include the following:

-Background of the learning programme.

-Who should attend/minimum entry level requirements.

-Strengths and weaknesses for implementing the programme.

-How feedback will be provided from the learner and from the Facilitator to the Training Provider.

-Sequence/process flow.

-Quality Assurance procedures/legal requirements/safety requirements.

-Time-frames.

-Methods and activity instructions.

-Resources required.

-Formative and Summative instructions.

 

STEP 6 : LEARNER GUIDE

Detailed learner guide that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hour’s breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

-Learning outcomes.

-Assessment Criteria + learning content.

-Learner feedback.

 

STEP 7 : WORKBOOK

Learner workbook that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Appeals policy

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hours breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner registration/CV/ID copy

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

 

STEP 8 : ASSESSMENT GUIDE

Reference to unit standard 115755

The complete Assessment guide that consist out of the following sections:

  1. Plan for Assessment.
  2. Preparation of the learner.
  3. Conduct Assessment.
  4. Judgement of the Assessment.
  5. Feedback to the learner.
  6. Review of the Assessment process.

 

STEP 9 : ASSESSMENT MEMO

–Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:

*Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked or could answer the question.

*Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

STEP 10 : MENTOR GUIDE

Depending on the type of programme, NQF level and the target group of learner, may the SETA also request a mentoring guide.

Mentor guide is similar to the Facilitator guide, but intended for the supervisor or manager in the workplace to guide them on the instructions and type of exposure the learners should get.

The mentor guide will also be a summary of all the guidelines and instructions given to the learner during the contact sessions for all the summative assessment instructions.

-What the leaner is busy with?

-Instructions provided to the learner during the delivery?

-What the learner should do?

-Period and level of experience required?

-What end-result is expected on completion?

 

STEP 11 : LOGBOOK

The credit calculation of the unit standard is based on a formula (multiple by x 10) that = to the total number of Notional Hours that must be achieved at the end of the learning programme.

Notional Hours consist out of (a) Theory and (b) Practical = Notional Hours.

In order to achieve the “practical” hours, the learner needs to demonstrate how he achieved this, (mostly in the workplace) by means of evidence. (Logbook).

Logbook can be in any form that can provide evidence that the learner (a) had the opportunity to practice the tasks in the workplace and (b) ensure that the minimum notional hours was completed.

WHAT IS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A PROGRAMME FOR APPROVAL THROUGH THE SETA

What you need to submit a Learning Programme for approval through the SETA.

The following steps are followed in order to submit a learning programme (unit standards) for approval through the ETQA (SETA).

Note: We make reference to the ETQA (Education Training Quality Authority) and not the SETA. The reason for this is because the ETQA Department/Manager within the SETA will review your programme and issue approval. (SETA has different departments who are responsible for different task. The ETQA manager will ultimately approve your programme.)

STEP 1: SETA APPLICATION

 Download the SETA application forms from their website, or contact their ETQA Manager and request the documents.

These documents may include:

-Application document that must be submitted with the programme in order to be processed.

-Include personal and Training Provider contact detail.

-Flow process, summary and matrix copy.

-Checklist that must be completed by the application to ensure all the documentation is correct and in order.

-Administration process (flow processes from printing to uploading)

-OPTIONAL: QMS Policy

 

STEP 2: LIST OF ASSESSORS AND MODERATORS

List of the Assessors and Moderators must be attached.

 

-Must have at least one (1) qualified assessors that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter from the SETA that allows the Assessors to assess in this unit standard.

-Must have at least one (1) qualified moderator that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter form the SETA that allows the Moderators to moderate in this unit standard.

-The Assessors and the Moderator cannot be the same person.

 

STEP 3: IF PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE:

This is “optional” for those individuals who purchased the programme from a third party or developer directory. (Did not develop their own material.)

 

The following information will be required additional with your submission:

-Copy of the purchase agreement that highlight the printing and usage rights.

-Internal moderators report to confirm you have the scope and resources to deliver this programme.

-If this material was previously approved for another training provider, copy/full details of this must also be supplied.

 

STEP 4 : MATRIX AND DELIVERY STRATEGY

Full matrix that include at least the following fields.

Summary:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Unit Standard Description
  3. Purpose of the Unit Standard
  4. Credits with a breakdown of the Notional Hours.
  5. NQF level
  6. Entry Level requirements.
  7. How the CCFO’s was covered and where it is covered in the learning programme.

Detailed:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Specific Outcomes + Numbered
  3. Assessment Criteria + Numbered
  4. Range Statements + Numbered
  5. CCFO + Numbered
  6. Learning Outcomes + Numbered
  7. Theory Notional Hours
  8. Practical Notional Hours
  9. Timeline in classroom
  10. Formative Activity methods
  11. Reference to Formative Activity numbers
  12. Summative Activity methods
  13. Reference to Summative Activity numbers.
  14. Resources, equipment required.
  15. Facilitation method (delivery strategy)

 

STEP 5 : FACILITATORS GUIDE

Detailed facilitator guide that include the following:

-Background of the learning programme.

-Who should attend/minimum entry level requirements.

-Strengths and weaknesses for implementing the programme.

-How feedback will be provided from the learner and from the Facilitator to the Training Provider.

-Sequence/process flow.

-Quality Assurance procedures/legal requirements/safety requirements.

-Time-frames.

-Methods and activity instructions.

-Resources required.

-Formative and Summative instructions.

 

STEP 6 : LEARNER GUIDE

Detailed learner guide that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hour’s breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

-Learning outcomes.

-Assessment Criteria + learning content.

-Learner feedback.

 

STEP 7 : WORKBOOK

Learner workbook that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Appeals policy

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hours breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner registration/CV/ID copy

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

 

STEP 8 : ASSESSMENT GUIDE

Reference to unit standard 115755

The complete Assessment guide that consist out of the following sections:

  1. Plan for Assessment.
  2. Preparation of the learner.
  3. Conduct Assessment.
  4. Judgement of the Assessment.
  5. Feedback to the learner.
  6. Review of the Assessment process.

 

STEP 9 : ASSESSMENT MEMO

–Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:

*Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked or could answer the question.

*Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

STEP 10 : MENTOR GUIDE

Depending on the type of programme, NQF level and the target group of learner, may the SETA also request a mentoring guide.

Mentor guide is similar to the Facilitator guide, but intended for the supervisor or manager in the workplace to guide them on the instructions and type of exposure the learners should get.

The mentor guide will also be a summary of all the guidelines and instructions given to the learner during the contact sessions for all the summative assessment instructions.

-What the leaner is busy with?

-Instructions provided to the learner during the delivery?

-What the learner should do?

-Period and level of experience required?

-What end-result is expected on completion?

 

STEP 11 : LOGBOOK

The credit calculation of the unit standard is based on a formula (multiple by x 10) that = to the total number of Notional Hours that must be achieved at the end of the learning programme.

Notional Hours consist out of (a) Theory and (b) Practical = Notional Hours.

In order to achieve the “practical” hours, the learner needs to demonstrate how he achieved this, (mostly in the workplace) by means of evidence. (Logbook).

Logbook can be in any form that can provide evidence that the learner (a) had the opportunity to practice the tasks in the workplace and (b) ensure that the minimum notional hours was completed.

Learning facilitation

What are these qualities? What are the behaviours?

Lets’ start with the behaviours, or skills, if you like. This is what facilitators do when with a group…

  • Challenge habitual thinking and behaviour
  • Hold space
  • Model behaviours
  • Notice and reflect back
  • Look for opportunities to get out of the way

Do I hear a how? How do facilitators do all of this? By…

  • Selecting appropriate activities and processes
  • Providing a suitable environment/space
  • Keeping track of time and progress
  • Clarifying, questioning, sometimes challenging and summarising
  • Being non-partisan, not taking sides, not having pre-determined answers/outcomes
  • Ensuring the group does the work
  • Ensuring that the group’s work is captured, when necessary (which implies knowing when that is)

Hmmm….Is that all there is to facilitating? What distinguishes pedestrian facilitation from great facilitation?

Maybe it’s the personal qualities, or attitudes, that facilitators bring…

  • Humility
  • Empathy
  • Bravery and a willingness to fail gracefully
  • Playfulness
  • Presence
  • Curiosity
  • Flexibility
  • Responsiveness

If I’m learning to be a facilitator, I probably want to learn the how (processes, techniques, tip and tricks) first. Then I’d want to know about application, when and why I would use one and not the other. Problem is, learning is not linear. It happens in loops and leaps, in small moments of clarity, in confusion and messiness. In other words, learning, and meaning, emerges. It can’t be structured in a way that makes sense to everyone because everyone learns differently (and no, I’m not thinking learning styles – that’s been well and truly debunked).

Here’s the dilemma. While learning is non-linear, the training is. It starts on Monday, finishes on Friday. Each day has a start and an end. We progress from one day to the next. Doing what? There’s no end of choices really.

It’s the curse of the agenda: in advance, we’ll decide we’ll do this, then that, then something else. I don’t know until I’m in the room with the group what the group really needs. The group becomes its own learning laboratory – it has within it all the complexity and messiness of any group of humans. It comes down to the curse of planning. We have the ability to think ahead, to plan what we’ll do. In many cases that’s a sensible thing to do. If I have to catch a plane I need to plan when to get to the airport, and make sure I go to the right airport. The consequences of not planning are pretty clear. I can apply the same thinking to working with a group of people. I can plan certain things – when we’ll start, when we’ll finish, where we will meet, when we will break for lunch, why we are meeting. It’s harder to plan for what might happen with a group of people, especially once I use a process that is participatory. If I follow a plan meticulously, I might miss some opportunity, or something important. If I have no plan at all…

I’ll need to draw on my ability to be spontaneous and improvise, to use what’s available (including the people in the room) combined with my own skills and knowledge of facilitation.

If an agenda is not so helpful, what is? Learning outcomes? At the end of this training, you will be able to…will understand…will know… Hmmm… There might be a shift towards these things. Learning may happen during the training. Most likely it won’t. It might happen next time one of them is in front of a group. Who am I to determine what learning you need? Nope, learning outcomes don’t help me.

In the end I need to do what I usually do – start somewhere, see what happens. Notice. Respond. Do something else. Explain what I’m doing and why. Provide opportunities to experience different approaches (processes) – not just watch, actually be a part of them, exploring topics that illuminate even more about working with groups. I need to be prepared for a number of possible approaches and to offer a rich and diverse, human, experience that enables people to learn at their own pace, to struggle in their own way, to allow meaning and insight to emerge by providing space and opportunities for them to make their own meaning, rather than me impose my meaning.

The topic of facilitation is so large, I need some anchors, some boundaries: time is one (a one-day course is very different from a five-day course); the participants and their current level of understanding is another (I won’t know that until I work with them). Briefing from the client? Can be unreliable, especially if they’re not sure themselves what they want. Facilitation principles? Too abstract. Qualities of a facilitator? Too obscure.

WHAT IS REQUIRED TO SUBMIT A PROGRAMME FOR APPROVAL THROUGH THE SETA

What you need to submit a Learning Programme for approval through the SETA.

The following steps are followed in order to submit a learning programme (unit standards) for approval through the ETQA (SETA).

Note: We make reference to the ETQA (Education Training Quality Authority) and not the SETA. The reason for this is because the ETQA Department/Manager within the SETA will review your programme and issue approval. (SETA has different departments who are responsible for different task. The ETQA manager will ultimately approve your programme.)

STEP 1: SETA APPLICATION

 Download the SETA application forms from their website, or contact their ETQA Manager and request the documents.

These documents may include:

-Application document that must be submitted with the programme in order to be processed.

-Include personal and Training Provider contact detail.

-Flow process, summary and matrix copy.

-Checklist that must be completed by the application to ensure all the documentation is correct and in order.

-Administration process (flow processes from printing to uploading)

-OPTIONAL: QMS Policy

 

STEP 2: LIST OF ASSESSORS AND MODERATORS

List of the Assessors and Moderators must be attached.

 

-Must have at least one (1) qualified assessors that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter from the SETA that allows the Assessors to assess in this unit standard.

-Must have at least one (1) qualified moderator that is (2) registered with the specific SETA and (3) have a valid letter form the SETA that allows the Moderators to moderate in this unit standard.

-The Assessors and the Moderator cannot be the same person.

 

STEP 3: IF PURCHASED FROM SOMEONE:

This is “optional” for those individuals who purchased the programme from a third party or developer directory. (Did not develop their own material.)

 

The following information will be required additional with your submission:

-Copy of the purchase agreement that highlight the printing and usage rights.

-Internal moderators report to confirm you have the scope and resources to deliver this programme.

-If this material was previously approved for another training provider, copy/full details of this must also be supplied.

 

STEP 4 : MATRIX AND DELIVERY STRATEGY

Full matrix that include at least the following fields.

Summary:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Unit Standard Description
  3. Purpose of the Unit Standard
  4. Credits with a breakdown of the Notional Hours.
  5. NQF level
  6. Entry Level requirements.
  7. How the CCFO’s was covered and where it is covered in the learning programme.

Detailed:

  1. Unit Standard Number
  2. Specific Outcomes + Numbered
  3. Assessment Criteria + Numbered
  4. Range Statements + Numbered
  5. CCFO + Numbered
  6. Learning Outcomes + Numbered
  7. Theory Notional Hours
  8. Practical Notional Hours
  9. Timeline in classroom
  10. Formative Activity methods
  11. Reference to Formative Activity numbers
  12. Summative Activity methods
  13. Reference to Summative Activity numbers.
  14. Resources, equipment required.
  15. Facilitation method (delivery strategy)

 

STEP 5 : FACILITATORS GUIDE

Detailed facilitator guide that include the following:

-Background of the learning programme.

-Who should attend/minimum entry level requirements.

-Strengths and weaknesses for implementing the programme.

-How feedback will be provided from the learner and from the Facilitator to the Training Provider.

-Sequence/process flow.

-Quality Assurance procedures/legal requirements/safety requirements.

-Time-frames.

-Methods and activity instructions.

-Resources required.

-Formative and Summative instructions.

 

STEP 6 : LEARNER GUIDE

Detailed learner guide that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hour’s breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

-Learning outcomes.

-Assessment Criteria + learning content.

-Learner feedback.

 

STEP 7 : WORKBOOK

Learner workbook that include the following:

-Unit Standard/Programme detail.

-Induction/background

-Appeals policy

-Purpose of the programme

-Range Statement

-Learner entry level requirements

-Learners with special needs

-Training methods that will be used.

-Tools and resources required for this programme.

-Credit and notional hours breakdown.

-Learner support.

-Assessment strategies.

-Formative and Summative activities.

-Navigation through the learner guide.

-Learner registration/CV/ID copy

-Learner rights and responsibilities

-Learner agreement

-Learning map/process flow

-Copy of the unit standard.

 

STEP 8 : ASSESSMENT GUIDE

Reference to unit standard 115755

The complete Assessment guide that consist out of the following sections:

  1. Plan for Assessment.
  2. Preparation of the learner.
  3. Conduct Assessment.
  4. Judgement of the Assessment.
  5. Feedback to the learner.
  6. Review of the Assessment process.

 

STEP 9 : ASSESSMENT MEMO

–Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:

*Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked or could answer the question.

*Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

STEP 10 : MENTOR GUIDE

Depending on the type of programme, NQF level and the target group of learner, may the SETA also request a mentoring guide.

Mentor guide is similar to the Facilitator guide, but intended for the supervisor or manager in the workplace to guide them on the instructions and type of exposure the learners should get.

The mentor guide will also be a summary of all the guidelines and instructions given to the learner during the contact sessions for all the summative assessment instructions.

-What the leaner is busy with?

-Instructions provided to the learner during the delivery?

-What the learner should do?

-Period and level of experience required?

-What end-result is expected on completion?

 

STEP 11 : LOGBOOK

The credit calculation of the unit standard is based on a formula (multiple by x 10) that = to the total number of Notional Hours that must be achieved at the end of the learning programme.

Notional Hours consist out of (a) Theory and (b) Practical = Notional Hours.

In order to achieve the “practical” hours, the learner needs to demonstrate how he achieved this, (mostly in the workplace) by means of evidence. (Logbook).

Logbook can be in any form that can provide evidence that the learner (a) had the opportunity to practice the tasks in the workplace and (b) ensure that the minimum notional hours was completed.